Archive for the ‘Birding’ Category

Tucson August Birding Festival

June 30th, 2012 by tucsonbb

Front Gate at Hacienda

Avid birders should plan now to attend the Tucson Bird & Wildlife Festival, August 15-19. This event celebrates the unique biodiversity of southeast Arizona with exciting educational opportunities for birders and nature enthusiasts to discover and enjoy the Sonoran Desert and Sky Islands.  There will be workshops, dinner programs, expert-led birding and natural history field trips, and even youth birder outings.  You can register online at the Tucson Audubon website.  If you want to stay in a desert environment on 17 secluded acres with 53 different birds identified by birders on the property, we invite you to stay at Hacienda del Desierto Bed & Breakfast while attending the festival.

Back Patio Garden at the Hacienda

Birds Visit Southwestern B & B

April 21st, 2012 by tucsonbb

Hummingbird Visits Backyard Garden

This Hummingbird is just one of the many visiting the blooming gardens at Hacienda del Desierto Bed & Breakfast in Tucson.  Three patios and courtyards offer tantalizing food options for these and other birds.  In the back patio is a cactus fountain, rose gardens, and many types of desert blooms.  Outside guestrooms on several of the porches and hanging in trees are other bird feeders.  The courtyard with an old Mexican fountain has more of the lush garden plants that require more water.  Bring your cameras and look for birds.

Dove on Tree feeder near House

 

Sandhill Cranes Due

December 29th, 2011 by tucsonbb

A Siege of Cranes

Birders come in droves to Southern Arizona to see the Sandhill Cranes during the month of January.  They are visible by the hundreds or thousands in areas near Willcox during this next month.  Wings Over Willcox Birding and Nature Festival celebrates all things avian from January 12-15.  There is a free nature exposition, a variety of free seminars, tours of scenic landscapes and historic sites, Sandhill Crane and Raptor watching spots, and a banquet featuring the Editor of Birding Magazine.  For additional details, go to the website Wings Over Willcox.  We encourage birding guests at the Hacienda to participate in the festival.

 

New Birds identified at Tucson Lodging

November 9th, 2009 by tucsonbb

Last week, eleven birds were added to our list of birds seen and identified on the property of Hacienda del Desierto Bed & Breakfast in Tucson, Arizona.  Guests who are expert bird watchers have identified sixty-two kinds of birds

Quail at Hacienda del Desierto

Quail at Hacienda del Desierto

that visit the Hacienda at different times of the year.  There are two fountains on the property that attract birds as well as two wild animal ponds, six hummingbird feeders, and eight birdseed feeders, two garden areas, and many trees and flowers that attract birds.

Abert’s Towhee                                  Verdin

Canyon Towhee                                  Phainopepla

Green-tailed Towhee                         Say’s Phoebe

Ash-throated flycatcher                       Gambel’s Quail

Black-headed grosbeak                        Greater Roadrunner

Bewick’s Wren                                          House Wren

Cactus Wren                                              Inca Dove

Rock Dove                                                  Hooded Oriole

White-winged Dove                                Northern Mockingbird

Morning Dove                                           White-throated Swift

American Goldfinch                                House Finch

Northern Cardinal                                    Gilded  Flicker

Pyrrhuloxia                                                Bendire’s Thrasher

Yellow-headed Blackbird                      Curved-bill ed Thrasher

Great horned owl                                      Elf Owl

Little Brown Bat                                         Purple Martin

Western Kingbird                                      Red-naped sapsucker

Brown-headed Cowbird                          Black chinned Hummingbird

Bronzed  Cowbird                                      Costa’s Hummingbird

Cedar Waxwing                                           Common Raven

Turkey Vulture                                           Gila Woodpecker

Anna’s Hummingbird                               Magnificent Hummingbird

Broad-billed Hummingbird                    White crowned Sparrow

House Sparrow                                            Chipping Sparrow

Black-throated Sparrow                           MacGillivray’s Warbler

Lucy’s Warbler                                             Black-throated Gray Warbler

Wilson’s Warbler                                         Cooper’s Hawk

Common Nighthawk                                  Red -tailed Hawk

Lesser  Nighthawk                                      Cooper’s Hawk

Black-tailed gnatcatcher                          Blue-gray Gnatcatcher

American Kestrel                                        Lesser  Goldfinch

Curious Roadrunner at Sonoran Desert Lodging

June 12th, 2009 by tucsonbb

Mr. Roadrunner has created quite a stir at our Tucson Arizona Bed & Breakfast Inn.  He flies through the wooden grill near our front gate into the enclosed courtyard and drinks from the fountain there.  He then hunts for moths and bugs which have collected during the night, drawn by the inside lights.  Guests love to watch him clean up the windowsill as they are eating breakfast in the dining area.  Of course as soon as they go to get their cameras, he often scoots away.

roadrunner at Hacienda del Desierto B & B, Tucson, AZHe also likes to watch as outdoor work is being done, as if to supervise the task.  He wants to know what is going on in “his” territory.

Arizona Roadrunners nest in the cactus and among scrubby Sonoran desert shrubs and bushes and seek refuge in higher areas if being chased or hunted.  The bird doesn’t fly high like other birds but gets his name from racing across roads in front of cars, reaching a speed of 15 miles per hour.  His speed also helps protect him from predators in the desert.

Yucca Water Feature Draws Birds to Tucson Lodging

May 29th, 2009 by tucsonbb

Morning Dove on Yucca Fountain

Morning Dove on Yucca Fountain

What a sight!  Yesterday afternoon we watched a cardinal land on our copper water fountain which was created to look like a yucca plant by Tucson Arizona artist Robert Dunklee of Falling Waters Fountains.  The copper turns green after awhile with the added white of hard water calcification which makes the fountain look like the real yucca plant. All kinds of birds land there constantly to drink and bath in the metal flower cups.  Of course, when I wanted to photograph the red bird, he wouldn’t cooperate, but I did get a shot of a Morning Dove sitting on top of the fountain flower cup.  I can really appreciate the patience of wildlife photographers with their specialty lenses.

Yucca Fountain on Cold Morning

Yucca Fountain on Cold Morning

We were challenged some years ago by an in-ground spa which was never built for efficiency and which we wanted to get rid of.  After attempts to make it into a flower garden with only mild success, we purchased this fountain which lent drama to the small patio and could be seen from the living room.  We lined the spa with plastic and added stone and pottery so that it looked natural.  In the winter when it occasionally drops to freezing, the water forms icicles which lends it another kind of beauty.  Guests at our Sonoran desert accommodation often enjoy this feature.

Spring Hummingbird News from our Tucson Inn

May 4th, 2009 by tucsonbb

Hummingbird outside of our Patio Suite

Hummingbird outside of our Patio Suite

Although my husband and I are not very knowledgeable about birds, we have a number of guests who are avid birders.  Over the years, they have identified 54 different types of birds at our Tucson, Arizona Inn, five of these being hummingbirds.  We have Black Chinned, Costa’s, Anna’s, Magnificent, and Broad-billed.  A mother is just now nurturing two baby chicks near the ceiling of the porch just outside the door of one of our guest suites.  Most of the time the mother seems unbothered by guests going in and out of that room, but at other times she swoops down toward a person’s head if she thinks they are getting too close to her chicks.  Soon we’ll see the babies sitting on the side of the nest getting their strength and courage to fly away.

Over the years, we have been fortunate a few of our guests have been experienced wildlife photographers.  Scott Robinson and his wife come every year in the spring for Southern Arizona bird watching, and this year he captured the stunning picture you see here of our mother sitting on her nest.  I should have asked him at the time if he knew which type of hummingbird it is, but I didn’t think of it.

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